Australian English Channel Record Attempt

Chloë McCardel, world record ocean swimmer, has announced that she will attempt four single crossings of the English Channel in the 2018 season, with the first crossing expected to take place during the next seven days.

If successful, these four crossings will break the current Australian record for most crossings of the Channel, taking it to 28.

This season has had incredible conditions so far, with numerous Australians successfully crossing the Channel. Excited about the attempt, McCardel said:

“Seeing so many Australians continue to attempt the Channel, especially the recent successful crossing by Brenda Norman for Channel 4 Change, inspires me.

“I’m hoping this Australian record attempt will show what a beautiful place the Channel is, and what a beautiful challenge it is.

“It’s a tough challenge, but that is what makes a successful single or multiple crossing so exciting.”

McCardel completed a double crossing of the Channel in 2017, and holds the current Australian record of 24 crossings. This includes one triple crossing and three double crossings. Also holding the world ocean swim record of 124.4km, McCardel was inducted to the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame in 2016.

By continuing to break new ground in ocean swimming, McCardel hopes to inspire people to live healthy, active lifestyles.

“Ocean swimming in Australia is incredible. We have such a beautiful coastline, with so many stunning beaches to explore.

“The ocean swimming community has grown so much in recent years, with many swimming clubs and social swimming groups in Australia promoting the camaraderie, fun, exhilaration and joy of ocean swimming.

“I believe the sport’s continued success can be attributed to our beautiful beaches and the dedicated volunteers who continue to drive their local swimming groups and ocean races.

“I encourage competitive and non-con competitive swimmers, and those new to ocean swimming, to find a local swimming group near them and dive in.”

Fitness is integral to McCardel and at the heart of her lifestyle, constantly challenging herself to be stronger, more powerful and confident in the water, both physically and mentally. McCardel believes that fitness, health, well-being and self-confidence enable us to persevere towards achieving our dreams.

Tuesday Training

Chloë would like to share what she has learnt to help other swimmers achieve their dreams, whether it be a personal challenge at a community swim event, a fundraising swim, triathlon or channel crossing.

Every Tuesday, Chloë McCardel will be sharing training tips on Instagram – covering technique, how to complete major swims, motivational techniques, focus, commitment to training, nutrition and more.

Join #tuesdaytraining – @chloemccardel on Instagram and let us know how Chloë can improve your swimming and help you reach your goals.

Bahamas: World Record Swim

Cheered on by her support crew, Chloë McCardel completes her remarkable  World Record for the Longest Ocean Swim in the Bahamas – 124.4km in 41.5 hours. 

On the Third Anniversary of the World Record, Chloë reflects on the incredible support crew, the mental and physical pain and conditions faced throughout the Bahamas swim. 

Three years ago today, I set the World Record for the Longest Ocean Swim in history – 124.4km in 41.5hrs. This record still stands.

The swim was completed under traditional marathon swimming rules – no wetsuit, fins, snorkel, shark cage, covering beyond a standard swim suit and no touching of a boat or support vessel. This includes no resting or sleeping.

The pain was incredible from severe sunburn and envenomation from box jellyfish. I even had hypothermia despite the 27°C water and air temperatures (possibly from vasodilation following the envenomation).

The mental challenge was torture akin to what I can only imagine solitary confinement in the dark would be like. I put faith in my team that I wouldn’t be breakfast, lunch or dinner for a hungry sea creature over two days. Being an ocean marathon swim there was every chance the tide or sea conditions could have pushed me away from the finish and that I may have never reached land. I kept faith in my team and my ability to hold an average pace of 3km/hr.

I had an iron-will to keep going despite what I was enduring. I had an incredible team on the boat and in kayaks to get me to the finish line, including my amazing husband Paul McQueeney. The team guided my every stroke and my wonderful sponsors – The Pool Enclosure Company (TPEC) and Lo-Chlor Chemicals (AquaSpa) – supported me behind the scenes. TPEC and AquaSpa are still great supporters today.

I am so very grateful to my team from that swim, my husband, my sponsors and everyone who supports me in my goal to be the best marathon swimmer in the world.

Chloë McCardel

 

 

The Fourth Lap: Maybe We Can Go Further

On 29 August 2017, Chloë McCardel attempted what is widely considered the greatest endurance challenge – the 136km quadruple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. This had never been attempted previously, let alone completed.

While unsuccessful on her first attempt, Chloë is extremely proud to have completed her third double crossing of the English Channel. Chloë does not see this attempt as a ‘failure’ but rather a step closer to achieving this incredible feat. It has provided her with an opportunity to learn more and find ways to improve. Chloë still believes a quadruple crossing of the English Channel is possible and is inspired to dramatically alter the perception of what the human mind and body can achieve in such harsh, inhospitable conditions.

Credit: Matthew Renew
gotshot.tv
matthewrenew.com

 

 

The Fourth Lap: Interview with Neil Mitchell

On 29 August 2017, Chloë McCardel attempted what is widely considered the greatest endurance challenge – the 136km quadruple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. This had never been attempted previously, let alone completed.

While unsuccessful on her first attempt, Chloë is extremely proud to have completed her third double crossing of the English Channel. Chloë does not see this attempt as a ‘failure’ but rather a step closer to achieving this incredible feat. It has provided her with an opportunity to learn more and find ways to improve. Chloë still believes a quadruple crossing of the English Channel is possible and is inspired to dramatically alter the perception of what the human mind and body can achieve in such harsh, inhospitable conditions.

Neil Mitchell (3AW) spoke with Chloë after her epic English Channel challenge.

The Fourth Lap: World Record Attempt

cropped-the-fourth-lap_black_logo.jpgOn 29 August 2017, Chloë attempted what is widely considered the greatest endurance challenge – the 136km quadruple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. This had never been attempted previously, let alone completed.

While unsuccessful on her first attempt, Chloë is extremely proud to have completed her third double crossing of the English Channel. Chloë does not see this attempt as a ‘failure’ but rather a step closer to achieving this incredible feat. It has provided her with an opportunity to learn more and find ways to improve. Chloë still believes a quadruple crossing of the English Channel is possible and is inspired to dramatically alter the perception of what the human mind and body can achieve in such harsh, inhospitable conditions.

Chloë, who is at the pinnacle of her career, is arguably the greatest ultra-marathon swimmer in history. In 2014, Chloë set the World Record for the longest unassisted ocean swim of 124.4km in 41.5 hours and in 2015, was the first Australian to complete a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. Only three other ultra-marathon swimmers have completed a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel, which were completed over 27 years ago.

In 2016, Chloë crossed the English Channel eight times, breaking the World Record for crossings in one season. This also gave her the Australian Record of 21 crossings of the English Channel, breaking Des Renford’s long-standing Australian record of 19 crossings.

In preparation for this epic feat, Chloë trained in water temperatures as low as 11°C for up to six hours; completed overnight training swims of up to 20 hours in 15°C, with 3°C air temperature; and distances of 110-140km in a week. This is the largest training block completed by Chloë, which also included pool training equivalent to a male 1,500m Olympic-level swimmer during their peak training period.

Chloë said, “I’ve reached all my original goals. I’ve pushed myself as much as I thought I could have. Now, it’s about pushing the boundaries of marathon swimming.”

“It’s about pushing the human spirit. What can our body and mind achieve? Do we really know our potential? Maybe we can go further.”

“I hope to keep pushing the sport and the human spirit forward.”

Over 700,000 people have completed Ironman triathlons. It is estimated that approximately 200 people have sailed non-stop solo around the world. Approximately 4,500 individuals have scaled Mt. Everest and over 10,000 Olympic gold medals have been awarded. Twelve people have walked on the moon and four people have completed a triple English Channel crossing. No one has yet attempted or completed a quadruple non-stop English Channel crossing.

The Fourth Lap

cropped-the-fourth-lap_black_logo.jpgOn 29 August 2017, Chloë attempted what is widely considered the greatest endurance challenge – the 136km quadruple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. This had never been attempted previously, let alone completed.

While unsuccessful on her first attempt, Chloë is extremely proud to have completed her third double crossing of the English Channel. Chloë does not see this attempt as a ‘failure’ but rather a step closer to achieving this incredible feat. It has provided her with an opportunity to learn more and find ways to improve. Chloë still believes a quadruple crossing of the English Channel is possible and is inspired to dramatically alter the perception of what the human mind and body can achieve in such harsh, inhospitable conditions.

Chloë, who is at the pinnacle of her career, is arguably the greatest ultra-marathon swimmer in history. In 2014, Chloë set the World Record for the longest unassisted ocean swim of 124.4km in 41.5 hours and in 2015, was the first Australian to complete a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. Only three other ultra-marathon swimmers have completed a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel, which were completed over 27 years ago.

In 2016, Chloë crossed the English Channel eight times, breaking the World Record for crossings in one season. This also gave her the Australian Record of 21 crossings of the English Channel, breaking Des Renford’s long-standing Australian record of 19 crossings.

In preparation for this epic feat, Chloë trained in water temperatures as low as 11°C for up to six hours; completed overnight training swims of up to 20 hours in 15°C, with 3°C air temperature; and distances of 110-140km in a week. This is the largest training block completed by Chloë, which also included pool training equivalent to a male 1,500m Olympic-level swimmer during their peak training period.

Chloë said, “I’ve reached all my original goals. I’ve pushed myself as much as I thought I could have. Now, it’s about pushing the boundaries of marathon swimming.”

“It’s about pushing the human spirit. What can our body and mind achieve? Do we really know our potential? Maybe we can go further.”

“I hope to keep pushing the sport and the human spirit forward.”

Over 700,000 people have completed Ironman triathlons. It is estimated that approximately 200 people have sailed non-stop solo around the world. Approximately 4,500 individuals have scaled Mt. Everest and over 10,000 Olympic gold medals have been awarded. Twelve people have walked on the moon and four people have completed a triple English Channel crossing. No one has yet attempted or completed a quadruple non-stop English Channel crossing.