Dover – August 14, 2020

Ultra-marathon swimmer Chloë McCardel is expected to leave British shores late Saturday evening (August 15) in her extraordinary quest to break the men’s world record for the greatest number of English Channel crossings.

The Melbourne-raised Sydneysider, who has spent many months in the UK over the past decade, has already completed 34 crossings of the treacherous stretch of water, including three crossings over 9 days.

Now level with the men’s world record, which has stood since July 21, 2006, Chloë should complete her 35th crossing at Cap Gris-Nez near Calais, France, tomorrow night weather-permitting. The 34-kilometre (21 miles) crossing between England and France – the world’s busiest shipping lane -is expected to take her around ten hours.

She was recently granted an exemption to leave Australia under current COVID-19 restrictions to attempt this record-breaking swim.

The 35-year-old elite athlete said: “I am so honoured to be setting off knowing that I am doing this for a bigger cause than myself. I’m hoping I can make friends and family proud, that my story will inspire others to never give up and that we CAN overcome extreme hurdles that life throws at us.

“I’m also sending my thoughts out to everyone impacted by the COVID pandemic, especially those who have been or are currently trapped in their homes, sometimes in extremely challenging environments, especially those who are experiencing domestic violence.

“Many might think that what I do needs superhuman strength but at one point in my life I was very vulnerable and suffered from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PSTD). Endurance training has helped me through those challenging periods in my life. I hope my efforts will inspire others – whoever they are and whatever their circumstances – to stay strong and resilient in these difficult times.”

If successful on Sunday, Chloë will move to second on the overall record list, behind retired English swimmer Alison Streeter MBE who has completed the crossing 43 times.

Chloë holds multiple world records for endurance swimming including the longest ever unassisted ocean swim in the Bahamas in 2014 (124.4km).

Bahamas: World Record Swim

Cheered on by her support crew, Chloë McCardel completes her remarkable  World Record for the Longest Ocean Swim in the Bahamas – 124.4km in 41.5 hours. 

On the Third Anniversary of the World Record, Chloë reflects on the incredible support crew, the mental and physical pain and conditions faced throughout the Bahamas swim. 

Three years ago today, I set the World Record for the Longest Ocean Swim in history – 124.4km in 41.5hrs. This record still stands.

The swim was completed under traditional marathon swimming rules – no wetsuit, fins, snorkel, shark cage, covering beyond a standard swim suit and no touching of a boat or support vessel. This includes no resting or sleeping.

The pain was incredible from severe sunburn and envenomation from box jellyfish. I even had hypothermia despite the 27°C water and air temperatures (possibly from vasodilation following the envenomation).

The mental challenge was torture akin to what I can only imagine solitary confinement in the dark would be like. I put faith in my team that I wouldn’t be breakfast, lunch or dinner for a hungry sea creature over two days. Being an ocean marathon swim there was every chance the tide or sea conditions could have pushed me away from the finish and that I may have never reached land. I kept faith in my team and my ability to hold an average pace of 3km/hr.

I had an iron-will to keep going despite what I was enduring. I had an incredible team on the boat and in kayaks to get me to the finish line, including my amazing husband Paul McQueeney. The team guided my every stroke and my wonderful sponsors – The Pool Enclosure Company (TPEC) and Lo-Chlor Chemicals (AquaSpa) – supported me behind the scenes. TPEC and AquaSpa are still great supporters today.

I am so very grateful to my team from that swim, my husband, my sponsors and everyone who supports me in my goal to be the best marathon swimmer in the world.

Chloë McCardel

 

 

The Fourth Lap: Maybe We Can Go Further

On 29 August 2017, Chloë McCardel attempted what is widely considered the greatest endurance challenge – the 136km quadruple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. This had never been attempted previously, let alone completed.

While unsuccessful on her first attempt, Chloë is extremely proud to have completed her third double crossing of the English Channel. Chloë does not see this attempt as a ‘failure’ but rather a step closer to achieving this incredible feat. It has provided her with an opportunity to learn more and find ways to improve. Chloë still believes a quadruple crossing of the English Channel is possible and is inspired to dramatically alter the perception of what the human mind and body can achieve in such harsh, inhospitable conditions.

Credit: Matthew Renew
gotshot.tv
matthewrenew.com

 

 

The Fourth Lap: World Record Attempt

cropped-the-fourth-lap_black_logo.jpgOn 29 August 2017, Chloë attempted what is widely considered the greatest endurance challenge – the 136km quadruple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. This had never been attempted previously, let alone completed.

While unsuccessful on her first attempt, Chloë is extremely proud to have completed her third double crossing of the English Channel. Chloë does not see this attempt as a ‘failure’ but rather a step closer to achieving this incredible feat. It has provided her with an opportunity to learn more and find ways to improve. Chloë still believes a quadruple crossing of the English Channel is possible and is inspired to dramatically alter the perception of what the human mind and body can achieve in such harsh, inhospitable conditions.

Chloë, who is at the pinnacle of her career, is arguably the greatest ultra-marathon swimmer in history. In 2014, Chloë set the World Record for the longest unassisted ocean swim of 124.4km in 41.5 hours and in 2015, was the first Australian to complete a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. Only three other ultra-marathon swimmers have completed a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel, which were completed over 27 years ago.

In 2016, Chloë crossed the English Channel eight times, breaking the World Record for crossings in one season. This also gave her the Australian Record of 21 crossings of the English Channel, breaking Des Renford’s long-standing Australian record of 19 crossings.

In preparation for this epic feat, Chloë trained in water temperatures as low as 11°C for up to six hours; completed overnight training swims of up to 20 hours in 15°C, with 3°C air temperature; and distances of 110-140km in a week. This is the largest training block completed by Chloë, which also included pool training equivalent to a male 1,500m Olympic-level swimmer during their peak training period.

Chloë said, “I’ve reached all my original goals. I’ve pushed myself as much as I thought I could have. Now, it’s about pushing the boundaries of marathon swimming.”

“It’s about pushing the human spirit. What can our body and mind achieve? Do we really know our potential? Maybe we can go further.”

“I hope to keep pushing the sport and the human spirit forward.”

Over 700,000 people have completed Ironman triathlons. It is estimated that approximately 200 people have sailed non-stop solo around the world. Approximately 4,500 individuals have scaled Mt. Everest and over 10,000 Olympic gold medals have been awarded. Twelve people have walked on the moon and four people have completed a triple English Channel crossing. No one has yet attempted or completed a quadruple non-stop English Channel crossing.

The Fourth Lap

cropped-the-fourth-lap_black_logo.jpgOn 29 August 2017, Chloë attempted what is widely considered the greatest endurance challenge – the 136km quadruple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. This had never been attempted previously, let alone completed.

While unsuccessful on her first attempt, Chloë is extremely proud to have completed her third double crossing of the English Channel. Chloë does not see this attempt as a ‘failure’ but rather a step closer to achieving this incredible feat. It has provided her with an opportunity to learn more and find ways to improve. Chloë still believes a quadruple crossing of the English Channel is possible and is inspired to dramatically alter the perception of what the human mind and body can achieve in such harsh, inhospitable conditions.

Chloë, who is at the pinnacle of her career, is arguably the greatest ultra-marathon swimmer in history. In 2014, Chloë set the World Record for the longest unassisted ocean swim of 124.4km in 41.5 hours and in 2015, was the first Australian to complete a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel. Only three other ultra-marathon swimmers have completed a triple non-stop crossing of the English Channel, which were completed over 27 years ago.

In 2016, Chloë crossed the English Channel eight times, breaking the World Record for crossings in one season. This also gave her the Australian Record of 21 crossings of the English Channel, breaking Des Renford’s long-standing Australian record of 19 crossings.

In preparation for this epic feat, Chloë trained in water temperatures as low as 11°C for up to six hours; completed overnight training swims of up to 20 hours in 15°C, with 3°C air temperature; and distances of 110-140km in a week. This is the largest training block completed by Chloë, which also included pool training equivalent to a male 1,500m Olympic-level swimmer during their peak training period.

Chloë said, “I’ve reached all my original goals. I’ve pushed myself as much as I thought I could have. Now, it’s about pushing the boundaries of marathon swimming.”

“It’s about pushing the human spirit. What can our body and mind achieve? Do we really know our potential? Maybe we can go further.”

“I hope to keep pushing the sport and the human spirit forward.”

Over 700,000 people have completed Ironman triathlons. It is estimated that approximately 200 people have sailed non-stop solo around the world. Approximately 4,500 individuals have scaled Mt. Everest and over 10,000 Olympic gold medals have been awarded. Twelve people have walked on the moon and four people have completed a triple English Channel crossing. No one has yet attempted or completed a quadruple non-stop English Channel crossing.